The Here And Now by Ann Brashares

The Here And Now, Book Journey, Ann Brashares

Premma James has lived in New York since she was twelve years old.   But Premma did not move from another state or another country to New York.

She moved from another time. The year 2090. The future.

In Premma’s time the world is in shambles due to a mosquito-born virus that killed millions.  For Premma, and those like her who have escaped to the past to live better lives, they are under strict rules:

1.  Never reveal where you are from

2.  Never interfere with history

3.  Never be intimate with someone outside their community

And that works just fine.  Until Premma meets Ethan Jarves.



YA with an environmental flavor!  ~Sheila


The Here And Now is A fairly quick paced YA read.  Premma makes for a wonderful environmentally conscious protagonist.  Her personal goals of trying to help prevent the future from happening as she knows it currently stands is admirable.

I enjoyed the read for the most part.  The way things fall together is a little convenient, however my enjoyment of world building books allowed that fact to lapse into the overall enjoyment of the book.


Fun Fact:  Ann Brashares is also the author of The Traveling Pants books, which was also a fun movie.  If you are familiar with that story you know what style of writer Ann is.  Her characters are relational and three-dimensional which makes for good reading!

10 Comments on “The Here And Now by Ann Brashares

  1. I am a sucker for time travel books: The Time Traveler’s Wife and Doomsday Book are two of my favorites. I may have to pick this up. It sounds like a quick but enjoyable read. Thanks for your review!

  2. Pingback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? | Book Journey

  3. The Here And Now sounds interesting enough to add to my readinglist; I needed some lightweight but interesting novels and it seems like this one might just do the job. Thanks!

  4. I loved this book. I did read it really quickly. I suggested it for my book club to read in July. I think the premise was really interesting. All I could think was to call it a reverse dystopian novel (still not a Utopia, though!). It was so well-written and captivating.

%d bloggers like this: