The Divorce Papers by Susan Rieger

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Sophie Diehl is very happy at her pace in a New England Law Firm as a Criminal Law Associate.  And… if she does say so herself, she is a pretty darn good one too.  One weekend when everyone is out of the office either on other business or on vacation, Sophie is tasked with doing an intake interview for divorce proceedings for a daughter of a high-profile client. 

It is just the intake interview, Sophie is assured, but Mia Meiklejohn Durkheim likes Sophie’s “take no prisoner” attitude and decides that Sophie is who she wants to represent her.  So much in fact, that she is willing to pay double to secure her services.  While Sophie does everything she can to politely pass, the partners of the firm assure her that is she is who Mia wants…. then she is who Mia will get.

*gulp*

With the help of a couple of the divorce lawyers in the firm, and facing the wrath of the female partner who is actually a divorce lawyer who would have received this case had she not been on vacation, Fiona McGregor, Sophie struggles through using her skills as a criminal lawyer to create an interesting divorce case.

 

 

 

I have this in book format and I downloaded it on Audible as well.  I went audio due to wanting to get to the book, but not having the time to sit and read. 

At first as I started listening to this audio, I was surprised to pick up on the fact that this book was going to be told in correspondence… IE. emails, letters, post it notes….  (In hindsight I really do not know why I was surprised… after all it is called DIVORCE PAPERS).  :oops:  I was really hoping that there would be more of the story told out of the context of written communications…

Then…

I got into the rhythm of the book, finding myself looking forward to correspondence with certain people, such as Sophie’s communications with David, her boss who was working on the case as support to her lack of divorce law knowledge. I enjoyed his voice and when I would hear his narration start I would get excited to hear what he had to say.

Yes there is a lot of law speak.  It did become a bit tedious that almost all of  the correspondence started with a date, an address, who the correspondence was too, who it was copied too, and what attachments there were to go along with said correspondence.  For this, I think the audio served me well as I imagine that with all this information I would skim if I had read the book.  For that matter, correspondence that did not interest me I probably would have skimmed as well, and again the audio does not allow for that so I probably did the book more justice by listening to it.

I enjoyed The Divorce Papers.  I actually learned a few things that take place in such proceedings, and the knowledge seeker in me enjoyed that.  To me, the story was a bit over the top with both parties of the divorce either having money at the ready, or high dollar property in their name as well as collections such as paintings…  this however did not dampen my enjoyment of the read. 

 

 

 

About Sheila (Book Journey)

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Posted on April 13, 2014, in audio review and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. This one has been on my list…and while I don’t normally like the writing style of letters and e-mails, I have noticed that I do settle into the style after a bit.

  2. This sounds like it might be better in print since it’s told via correspondence.

  3. I read the print version and enjoyed it but I wouldn’t have thought this would work very well as an audio book at all,

  4. I was very interested how this book was going to pan out. Saw it on many blogs but this is the first review I’ve got to. Thanks.

  5. I’d probably like this one more in print…

  6. I almost grabbed this at B&N the other day! Looks like I’ll need to add this to my list! I actually tend to like books written in weird ways (such as correspondence). Great post!

  7. Hi,
    Just finished listening to the audio-book and I totally agree with you that listening stops you skipping over the “boring bits”, which are quite interesting. Fully agree with your review, so won’t repeat. So glad you felt that some of it was a bit over the top because of all these people coming from such a rich background. One of the reasons I (as a European interested in “real” American life – i.e. not Hollywood, Disney or CSI) listened to it, was to find out how it divorce is done “American style” and legally it is clearly quite different. What is the same so of course is the hurt divorce causes everyone, especially children. Personally, I always feel people marry and divorce to quickly. The one bit I found quite sad was the way everybody seemed to think that adultery was not that bit a deal!

    Thanks for reviewing this, wouldn’t have heard about it otherwise. Any other suggestions for “real American life” always welcome.

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